Great Plains Simba Models Show Potential in States

The SL and other Great Plains Simba machines perform well in Wisconsin
The SL and other Great Plains Simba machines perform well in Wisconsin

Selected models from Great Plains’ Simba range made an excellent impression when tested on farms in Wisconsin, USA – a region where farming patterns are similar to many parts of Europe.

The Simba DTX, Simba SL and Simba X-Press were all run on a number of farms in the state, and impressed those who saw them work, says David Holmes, UK Sales Director:

“These field tests were set up by Great Plains Wisconsin Territory Manager Trevor Dybevik and the main Great Plains dealer in the region Lindstrom, which already sells European brands including Fendt on the basis of features and benefits rather than price”.

All three machines tested performed well, he says: “On the first farm we ran the DTX with the legs working 250mm (10”) and the discs 75mm (3”) on a dairy farm where the customer is looking to repair compacted ground, incorporate manure and establish cover crops, while also leaving a weather-proof surface to counter erosion issues on undulating ground.

“Importantly we can offer auto-reset protection of the restructuring legs, which would be essential for the many farmers in the state who have to deal with embedded rocks.

“The SL then worked successfully to 200mm (8”) with the discs at 50mm (2”) for a customer cultivating and repairing the soil surface while leaving a weatherproof surface. Visitors also complimented the fact that we can fit a small seed applicator and tow an additional roller like the Aqueel to achieve erosion protection in one pass.

“When we ran the X-Press before manure application there was much less run-off thanks to the ridged surface left by the DD roller, which actually enabled the farmer to make a double application.

“We moved the X-Press to work in heavy trash conditions behind Twin-Row corn with the discs set straight to maximise chop trash and it performed well, with the DD roller leaving a finish that could improve crop residue breakdown over winter.

“The SL also completed some work on lighter and medium land with the tines working at their maximum 250mm (10”) and the discs at 75mm (3”) on land which is irrigated, and where the Aqueel or single DD press might have a role.

“In all cases the potential to reduce the number of passes – while also solving technical issues – is seen as a significant benefit of Great Plains Simba machines, and this is a market we will look to develop”.